Quantum Transport in Nanostructures and Molecules

Quantum Transport in Nanostructures and Molecules

An introduction to molecular electronics

Professor Colin John Lambert

$159.00

  • Description
  • Author
  • Info
  • Reviews

Description

This reference text presents a conceptual framework for understanding room-temperature electron and phonon transport through molecules and other quantum objects. The flow of electricity through molecules is explained at the boundary of physics and chemistry, providing an authoritative introduction to molecular electronics for physicists, and quantum transport for chemists.

Professor Lambert provides a pedagogical account of the fundamental concepts needed to understand quantum transport and thermoelectricity in molecular-scale and nanoscale structures. The material provides researchers and advanced students with an understanding of how quantum transport relates to other areas of materials modelling, condensed matter and computational chemistry. After reading the book, the reader will be familiar with the basic concepts of molecular-orbital theory and scattering theory, which underpin current theories of quantum transport.

Key Features

  • Introduces molecular electronics for physicists, and quantum transport for chemists.
  • Presents a conceptual framework for understanding room-temperature electron and phonon transport through molecules and other quantum objects.
  • Provides a pedagogical account of quantum-interference-enhanced electrical and thermal properties of single molecules and self-assembled monolayers. 
  • Provides readers with an understanding of how quantum transport relates to other areas of materials modelling, condensed matter or computational chemistry. 
  • Discusses concepts needed to engineer the properties of molecules and create new functions. 
  • Includes MATLAB codes to allow the reader to expand the examples presented in the book.


Author

Professor Colin John Lambert:

Professor Colin J. Lambert is a research professor in the Department of Physics at Lancaster University, and a world leader in the field of single-molecule electronics. He has been a professor at Lancaster since 1990 and was awarded a research professorship in 2010. He is also a visiting professor in the Materials Department at the University of Oxford, and an elected member of Academia Europaea.

Info

Reviews